Russian masterpieces by Ilgiz F.

A tribute to the artistry of Ilgiz Fazulzyanov, for his 50th birthday and 25-year career, during which, he’s won many awards for his extraordinary technique and creativity


  • A portrait of Ilgiz Fazulzyanov in his atelier

    A portrait of Ilgiz Fazulzyanov in his atelier

Kazan, the capital of the Russian Republic of Tartastan is for most people, like saying 'in the middle of nowhere.' Yet, in that remote area, far from any possible influx of trends or styles, the artistic talent of Ilgiz Fazulzyanov was cultivated. And before winning the 'Champion of the Champions' title twice, in 2011 and 2013, at the International Jewellery Design Excellence Awards, he was already known all over the world as an extraordinary designer. It is no surprise that in 2016 his important solo exhibition was hosted at the Kremlin. A deserved tribute to his first 25 years of work , celebrated in 2017, just before his 50th birthday in 2018. «I got into this profession quite by chance. My family had nothing to do with any kind of art and they were very surprised when I decided to go to art school when I was eight years old. I graduated fromthe Kazan Art School as a painter but I did some training in traditional jewelry making, which set me on a different career path. Friends and acquaintances began to bring me their jewelry with requests to do something special with it. My sense of pride prevented me from admitting ignorance or inability, so I had to learn quickly. After mastering the jewelry — making techniques and traditions of the Volga Tatars, I opened my first workshop in Kazan and began designing my own pieces. At first, I produced fine filigree work in the Tatarstyle. This is the reason why I don’t have technical or creative limitations, which usually occur as a result of academicor classic education.


  • Ilgiz Fazulzyanov at work. He was born in 1968 in Zelenodolsk, near Kazan, Republic of Tatarstan, Russia.

    Ilgiz Fazulzyanov at work. He was born in 1968 in Zelenodolsk, near Kazan, Republic of Tatarstan, Russia.

Basically, I don't have blinders — I never say 'you cannot do this' and 'you cannot do that' to myself — I just imagine and find a way to bring something to life. I am usually inspired by nature. Nature is the most perfect creation on earth.To recreate a flower, butterfly or dragonfly, and to replicate not only a static image, but to capture the elusive transformation, which is always in motion forevery living creature, is a great challenge for me as an artisan. So, I'm sure that nature's inspiration will never end. You couldn't compete with God in terms of creativity and excellence but you could work as hard as you could and be closer to him than others. But of course, there are other sources. I'm very interested in the works of a number of artists— Russian artists like Vasnetsov, Vrubel and others — because they demonstrate different techniques. I respect colleagues such as Lalique, Hemmerle and Wallace Chan, but I do not look at them as sources of inspiration. I have always been fascinated by vintage carved wardrobes with glass windowed doors that allowed you to see the windowed doors that allowed you to see the treasures cherished by their owners within. In thinking about it, there is something mystical and fairytale-like about them. I decided to create a collection based on these childhood impressions, and to use faceted quartz stones to show things I hold inside myself. Sometimes, I'm inspired by unusual things, like city sounds and the photos in the editorials of my wife's magazines. I create done of my rings thinking about NewYork City, its architecture, its residents and a common feeling for the city. I'm not very familiar with contemporary art, however, the work of some fashion designers couldin spire me. If I had to describe my style, I’d say it's classic, with contemporary energy and passion. That's it... As of late, I’m working on my new collection 'Great Mountains'. There are five rings dedicated to the greatest mountains in the world, such as Fuji, Kilimanjaro, Ararat, Vesuvius and Himalaya. All of them are linked by a common shape with some recognizable elements. And all of them are made using my favorite enamel technique, champlevé. In this particular project, I have a specific goal: to improve myskills, piece by piece, using this technique.»

  • Coral, onyx and enamel for the Poppies Art Déco brooch.

    Coral, onyx and enamel for the Poppies Art Déco brooch.

  • Irises Around the Pond bracelet

    Irises Around the Pond bracelet

  • Enamel and diamonds for the Dragonflies on Gyachynth brooch.

    Enamel and diamonds for the Dragonflies on Gyachynth brooch.

  • Details of the Kilimanjaro ring, Great Mountains collection, in enamel champlevé

    Details of the Kilimanjaro ring, Great Mountains collection, in enamel champlevé

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